Progress Report for Reducing Malnutrition in Haiti

Assisting in lessening poverty in Haiti
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PROGRESS REPORT 9

Summary

Increasing Nutrition and Resilience Through Diversified Micro Home Enterprises in partnership with Second Mile Haiti for the period September 1, 2021 - November 30, 2021

PROJECT UPDATE

Graduate & Neighbor Gardens

Since the project’s inception, we have installed 214 gardens for Malnutrition Program Graduates and 415 gardens for the neighbors of these individuals. As of the end of this reporting period, we have completed 87% of 720 gardens. 629 gardens have been installed and 1,817 home garden visits have been conducted. In addition to the 629 individuals directly impacted through this project, another 4,445 household members have gained access to garden fresh produce. We concluded one 12-week gardening cycle with 90 beneficiaries on November 12th. A second 12-week cycle was started on November 26th and will finish February 18, 2021. We did not have any issues purchasing supplies during this reporting period. However, a week of heavy rain did cause a delay in the installation of 60 gardens that were set for installation the last week in November. These gardens have since been installed, but will be counted in Progress Report #9 as their installation dates fall within the month of December. As discussed in the previous report, the 12-week strategy allows us to complete 90 gardens for 15 new graduate beneficiaries and 75 new neighbor beneficiaries every 3 months. The 12-week schedule allows for three home visits for each beneficiary plus phone communication as needed. This quarter we reviewed the results of the 90-person garden cohort that ran from March 15, 2021 through June 4th, 2021. Ninety-three percent of these gardens resulted in some harvest. At the first visit (4 weeks after planting) a status was attributed to each garden by the garden technician. 72% of gardens were labelled “good”, 19% “satisfactory”, and 8% “weak”. One garden had died. At the second visit (9 weeks after planting), 67% of gardens were labelled “good”, 20% “satisfactory”, 7% “weak”, while another 7% of gardens were no longer viable. This quarter we reviewed the results of the 90-person garden cohort that ran from August 16, 2021 through November 5th, 2021. Eighty-two percent of these gardens resulted in some harvest. At the first visit (4 weeks after planting) a status was attributed to each garden by the garden technician. 60% of gardens were labelled “excellent”, 16% “satisfactory”, and 6% “weak.” Seventeen gardens had failed to sprout. At the second visit (9 weeks after planting), 39% of gardens were labelled “excellent”, 49% “satisfactory”, 8% “weak”, while another 8% of gardens were no longer viable. Difficulties encountered by beneficiaries ranged from problems with pests and animal entry to heavy rains and difficulty obtaining adequate water. Below is a comparison between the issues encountered by the various groups of beneficiaries that started their home gardens earlier this year.

Practice Gardens

We are still very happy with how well the practice garden is working as a way to train prospective graduate caregivers in skills related to vegetable gardening. Food obtained from the practice gardens continues to be used in three primary ways: 1) in meals for caregivers and snacks for the children recovering from malnutrition 2) to save seeds for use in the home gardens, and 3) to provide food for caregiver graduates who do not have space for home gardening.

Business

As of the end of this reporting period, we have reached our goal of distributing 144 business kits. The beneficiaries of these business kits have largely fared exceptionally well considering the volatility of the economic situation in Haiti during this year. An in depth analysis of these businesses and the subsequent accomplishments of their recipients, will be provided in the subsequent progress report.

Food, Forest and Nursery

In 2021, we began weighing produce from the garden before it was used in the kitchen or given away to beneficiaries. During this reporting period, we used and distributed 110 lbs of produce, down from 148 lbs (June - August), 196 lbs (March - May), and 120 lbs (Jan & Feb). At a team meeting, we discussed ways to increase the amount of food we produce onsite. Plans for the new year include, increasing the amount of Papaya and Plaintain trees onsite and adding additional parcels for vegetables. Over the next three months we expect to harvest okra, cabbage, sweet pepper, spinach, coconut, starfruit, and parsley.